Russian crowdfunded reflector satellite aims to be “brightest star in the sky” | Ars Technica

Russia has explored orbiting even bigger reflectors in the past. In 1993, a Progress cargo ship bound for the Mir space station carried aloft Znamya (“Banner”), a 65-foot diameter reflective disk of plastic coated with aluminum. While it was also intended to test the feasibility of solar sails, Znamya was an experiment in orbital lighting—using orbiting mirrors to light parts of the earth (or even entire cities) at night with reflected sunlight. The idea behind the program was that a collection of orbiting mirrors could be used to extend the length of daylight hours for harvests, major construction projects, and disaster response operations, a concept originally concocted by German space theorist Hermann Oberth (one of the fathers of modern rocketry) in the 1920s.

Source: Russian crowdfunded reflector satellite aims to be “brightest star in the sky” | Ars Technica

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